iw-logo_225

Sponsored by:

axonify-logo_143x41

INTERACTIVE GUIDE

The Future of Manufacturing

0 %

Companies with engaged employees outperform their disengaged competitors by up to 202%.

Engaged frontline employees will take operations to the next level.

In the highly competitive world of manufacturing, the ability to keep pace with change delivers a much-needed advantage. Manufacturers must look for ways to continuously engage and educate their workforce to ensure employees can keep up with the business. This means figuring out how to deal with the challenges associated with an industry that’s in a constant state of flux.

This interactive guide explores the implications of these key challenges and how to overcome them.

Do you face these key operational challenges?

Changing Expectations
Changing Expectations
Responding to ever-changing expectations requires organizational agility and alignment.
Safety and Compliance
Safety and Compliance
Employees exhibit incorrect and unsafe behaviors, resulting in costly and dangerous mistakes.
Employee Engagement
Employee Engagement
Manufacturing employees are notoriously disengaged—but engagement is a critical success factor.
Hyper-Diverse Workforce
Hyper-Diverse Workforce
Effectively managing the modern, multigenerational, multilingual workforce is more difficult than ever.

What if you could…

  • Turn every employee into a top performer, allowing you to meet customer and stakeholder expectations and achieve your business goals?
  • Change employee behaviors in a way that makes safety a habit—allowing you to move from simply checking the safety compliance box to creating a proactive culture of safety?
  • Quickly onboard, retrain and upskill frontline employees with personalized content designed to address knowledge and skills gaps?
  • Motivate employees to voluntarily participate in training—again and again—without pulling them off the floor?

Challenge 1: Changing Expectations

downarrow-blueartboard-1-copy-7

Expectations of Excellence Are on the Rise

In today’s fierce markets, lean manufacturing and continuous improvement are no longer enough to meet rising expectations. To keep consumers, stakeholders, business leaders and employees happy while staying ahead of the competition, many manufacturers are focusing on operational excellence.

Business stakeholders want manufacturers to modernize operations in an effort to continuously increase efficiency and yield, decrease safety incidents and shorten production cycles—all while maintaining quality, reducing costs and remaining competitive. In other words, they want operational excellence.

Consumers want more. Global consumption is projected reach to increase by $23 trillion in the next decade alone.2 But consumers don’t just want more products in higher volume, they also want more customized, higher-quality products—and they want them now.

Leaders are asking more of their workforce. They expect frontline workers to keep up with the business. That means continuously learning—whether it’s how to use the newest machines or technology or the latest changeover process.

The modern workforce expects more from employers. Having grown accustomed to the conveniences of modern technologies in their personal lives, they expect the same in the workplace. They also expect employers to provide them with the tools and training they need to perform their jobs skillfully and safely.

Consumers want more. Global consumption is projected reach to increase by $23 trillion in the next decade alone. But consumers don’t just want more products in higher volume, they also want more customized, higher-quality products—and they want them now.

Leaders are asking more of their workforce. They expect frontline workers to keep up with the business. That means continuously learning—whether it’s how to use the newest machines or technology or the latest changeover process.

The modern workforce expects more from employers. Having grown accustomed to the conveniences of modern technologies in their personal lives, they expect the same in the workplace. They also expect employers to provide them with the tools and training they need to perform their jobs skillfully and safely.

Slider

Operational excellence moves organizations beyond minimizing waste to consistent and reliable execution that drives growth and competitive advantage—which are required to meet ever-changing expectations. It also helps them to achieve business goals and KPIs, like overall equipment effectiveness (OEE). At the same time, it puts increasing pressure on employees to perform so the business can hit its targets.

Drivers of Operational Excellence

If a machine goes down, getting it back on line as soon as possible is vital. It’s essential that the operator minimize downtime and limit the implications of the breakdown. But this requires knowing how to do the right thing in the moment.

When operators have the specific knowledge they need to do their jobs, they’re able to execute processes right the first time, reduce waste and contain defects to increase quality.

Operating at full production capacity to increase yield is a priority. When a highly specialized machinist is injured, mounting costs can have a snowball effect.

Preventing a workplace injury before it happens makes good sense and protects an organization’s bottom line.

Companies with the best safety records inherently understand that safety needs to be rooted in mindsets, attitudes, and behaviors—or, the culture—of their workforce. They understand that safety performance is a driver of operational excellence.

Challenge 2: Safety & Compliance

arrowartboard-1-copy-5

Moving Beyond Safety and Compliance

Safety is ultimately about people. The things people do and the decisions they make every day impact productivity, employee morale and profitability. If safety isn’t part of an ongoing conversation, employees won’t value it or even remember how to stay safe on the job.

Daily behavior is the first step to building a safety culture that is proactive instead of reactive. When your frontline employees know and do the right thing at the right time, they can avoid making costly, and potentially fatal, mistakes.

Disengaged workers take their eye off the ball. Firms with higher engagement levels reported 70% fewer safety-related incidents.3

More than 7,600 people die each day from work-related accidents or diseases. That’s over 2.78 million deaths each year, in addition to 374 million non-fatal injuries and illnesses.4

Slider

Creating an environment where employees are motivated to adopt safety knowledge and practices moves beyond defining policies and procedures, mandatory compliance training, and employee communications. It makes safety a central part of every employee’s routine and creates a proactive culture of safety.

This requires high levels of employee engagement, which is a challenge in itself.

The Benefits of a Proactive Culture of Safety

High production capacity and efficiency.

Goods that are consistently delivered error-free, on time and undamaged.

Reduced costs of theft, breakage and accidents.

Increased employee engagement, morale and retention.

Challenge 3: Employee Engagement

downarrowsartboard-1-copy-13

The Employee Disengagement Dilemma

Engaging employees is notoriously difficult—especially manufacturing employees.

Employees in the manufacturing industry are the least engaged—and that’s just bad for business. Need proof? Research shows that disengaged employees drag down profits and cost the U.S. up to $550B in lost productivity each year.5

Fortunately, manufacturers can leverage the same technologies that are disrupting the industry to engage employees. For example, platforms that leverage mobile and social technology can help employers reach the frontline in real time, enabling them to communicate organizational and operational changes as they happen and support on-the-job training (without taking employees away from where they need to be to perform).

Gamification has emerged as a particularly effective and proven method of motivating employees to engage voluntarily with training content. Creating opportunities for continuous learning helps manufacturers address the widening skills gap by getting an increasingly diverse workforce onboarded and upskilled quickly so employees know and do the things that matter most to the business.

Employee Engagement by Occupation

Challenge 4: A Hyper-Diverse Workforce

downarrowsartboard-1-copy-14

A Complex and
Changing Workforce

Although Millennials represent the largest generation in the workforce, Baby Boomers still make up the largest demographic in manufacturing. Currently, more than a quarter of manufacturing workers are over the age of 55.6 As these seasoned employees retire at a rate of more than 10,000 a day (in the U.S alone),7 they take their decades of knowledge and skills with them and leave unfilled positions behind.

The Widening Skills Gap
The Boomer exodus, combined with how quickly and radically manufacturing is transforming, are contributing factors to the industry’s skills gap—which will only continue to grow.

By 2025 more than 2 million U.S. manufacturing jobs will go unfilled.8 Despite there being more than enough Millennials to fill these positions, manufacturers are struggling to attract this younger demographic. This is prompting manufacturers to look elsewhere for new talent, with up to 16% of new hires coming from non-manufacturing sectors.9

skill-gap-info-800

The challenge is to make sure this multicultural, multilingual and multigenerational workforce (consisting of full-time, part-time, seasonal, freelance and gig workers with varying levels of education and experience) has the knowledge and skills they need to operate at peak levels. If employees can’t reach their full potential, manufacturers won’t see any returns on the investments they’ve made to modernize their organization and get ahead of the competition.

Manufacturers will need to find ways to consistently engage their hyper-diverse workforces to deliver the training needed to onboard, retrain and upskill frontline employees in an effort to close knowledge and skills gaps.

A New Way Forward

Microlearning: modern training for modern manufacturers.

With all the changes and challenges that transformation brings, how do you ensure your people know the things you need them to know to perform. How do you get them to remember to do the right things?

In this fiercely competitive industry, success rides on the decisions employees make every day. That’s why it’s so important they know and do the right things on the job. To ensure employees help (instead of hinder) your transformation efforts, training and frontline behaviors need to align with the business strategy. That means ensuring your people know and do the right thing at the right time, every time. Microlearning helps you achieve this objective by getting your employees where they need to be—and keeping them there.

Microlearning is a new approach to training that delivers content in short, focused bites.

To be effective, microlearning must:

  • Fit naturally into the employee’s daily workflow.
  • Motivate people to participate.
  • Be based on brain science principles (how people actually learn).
  • Adapt continuously to ingrain the knowledge employees need to be successful.
  • Ultimately drive behaviors that impact specific business results.

Is microlearning right for your organization?

Take the quiz.



How to get started?

Establish Goals
Start with the results you want to achieve. Then, everything you do (from the technology you implement, the training you deliver, even the people you hire) should support your efforts to achieve these goals.
Identify Behaviors
Identify the behaviors and knowledge required to achieve these results. Training should focus on finding and fixing the wrong behaviors and reinforcing the right ones so that everyone in your workforce is on track.
Understand Workflows
Look at how your people work. Watch how they use their time. Note the tools and resources they use to do their jobs. This information will help you uncover right places and times to introduce microlearning opportunities.
Partner Up
You don’t need to recreate the wheel. Invite trusted partners to help you determine the best ways to introduce microlearning into your organization. You’ll get started faster and save time, effort and resources along the way.

Get Bottom-Line Results with Microlearning

Merck & Co., Inc. implemented the Axonify Microlearning Platform as part of their Safe by Choice program across 52 global manufacturing sites, to approximately 24,000 full- and part-time employees and contractors, in more than 10 languages.

RESULTS:

80% employee participation rate in just 12 months.

Decrease in recordable incident rate (RIR).

Decrease in lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR).

Increase in knowledge growth across all topics.

Walmart Logistics implemented the Axonify Microlearning Platform in more than 150 distribution centers across the United States to more than 75,000 associates, allowing them to achieve unprecedented safety results by building employee knowledge and translating it into job action.

RESULTS:

91% employee participation rate.

54% decrease in recordable incidents (during pilot).

15% knowledge growth across all safety topics.

Precision Resource provides critical component solutions for manufacturers around the world. With the Axonify Microlearning Platform, they are building a highly knowledgeable workforce that’s empowered to make the right decisions to keep their operation safe, productive and profitable.

RESULTS:

91% average employee participation rate since launch.

Increase in training without sacrificing productivity.

Streamline delivery of health & safety training.

12% increase in knowledge.

Slider

Learn more about how Axonify is helping manufacturers.

Start typing and press Enter to search

Share this on LinkedIn Share this on Twitter